(NEW YORK CITY) — The race to become New York City’s next mayor is one of the most consequential political contests in a generation, with the recovery of the nation’s largest city at stake. The winner of the Democratic primary is likely to win the general election in November. With 13 Democrats on the ballot and the city using ranked-choice voting for the first time, no one knows what to expect. Two Republicans are also competing in a bitter campaign to become the face of their party in New York City.

Your guide to the NYC mayoral primary election

What you need to know
What’s happening

•What’s happening: Thirteen Democrats and two Republicans ran in the New York City mayoral primaries, according to NYC’s Board of Elections.
•You’ll have to wait for results: NYC voters picked their party nominees for the first time using ranked-choice voting, and it could take weeks to determine the winners. CNN projects that the Democratic mayoral primary will be decided using ranked-choice voting tabulation after no candidate won a majority outright. The nominee is expected to be called by mid-July.
•Why this election matters: The candidates are vying for a chance to lead the country’s largest city as it faces rising crime, recovery from the pandemic and a range of other issues.

Updated: 12:02 a.m. ET, June 23, 2021

Eric Adams acknowledges ranked-choice voting process ahead and says today is “such a good feeling”

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams prepares to speak after voting during Primary Election Day at P.S. 81 on June 22, in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn borough in New York City. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams came out to chants that “the champ is here” — Muhammad Ali’s famous boast, sampled in a Jadakiss song — and addressed jubilant supporters on Tuesday night.

He acknowledged the ranked-choice process to come, as early, preliminary results Tuesday showed him ahead of the crowded field of candidates, but spoke as if the race was over.

We know, we know that this is going to be layers, this is the first early voting count. We know that. We know there’s going to be twos and threes and fours — we know that. But there’s something else we know. That New York City said ‘our first choice is Eric Adams,'” Adams said.

“We’re going to allow them to go through the process and count the ballots, and count all the ranking. And we know that this is an opportunity for people to participate, but the feeling today is just such a…such a good feeling,” he said amid cheers at his Brooklyn headquarters.

What comes next: The nominee is expected to be determined by mid-July and is heavily favored to win the general election in November. As of Tuesday night, Adams, former sanitation commissioner Kathryn Garcia and civil rights attorney Maya Wiley were the top contenders in the initial vote preferences among voters. These results could change once absentee ballots are included and the ranked-choice tabulation is run.


Since no candidate will win a majority of the first-choice votes, tabulation will continue in rounds. The candidate with the fewest votes after the initial count will be eliminated and all ballots for that candidate will be reallocated to the next highest-ranked candidate selected. That process will continue with the remaining candidates until two are left with the winner determined by who has the most votes in that final round.

New York City’s Board of Elections plans to release the first set of results from this ranked-choice voting process on June 29, but those results will only include votes from early in-person and election day voters, not absentee ballots. New York state law prevents the board from beginning to count absentee ballots until June 28.

The board will release the results of the ranked-choice voting process again on July 6, this time including as many absentee ballots as they’ve been able to process. They’ll report results again every Tuesday until all the ballots have been counted.

Updated on: 12:06 a.m. ET, June 23, 2021: Andrew Yang concedes and tells supporters he’s “not going to be mayor of NYC”

New York City mayoral candidate Andrew Yang speaks during a press conference with Assembly Member Simcha Eichenstein on June 21, in the Bensonhurst neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough in New York City. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Democratic NYC mayoral candidate Andrew Yang conceded in a speech on Tuesday as the results from early and primary day in-person voting came in showing he placed a distant fourth behind candidates Eric Adams, Kathryn Garcia and Maya Wiley.

“I am not going to be the mayor of New York City based on the numbers coming in tonight,” Yang told supporters.

CNN projects the New York City Democratic mayoral primary winner will be determined using ranked-choice voting tabulation.
Voters in the Big Apple had the option to rank up to five of the 13 candidates in the race. Since no candidate will win a majority of the vote outright, the New York City Board of Elections will tabulate voters’ ranked choices to determine the winner.
The nominee is expected to be determined by mid-July and is heavily favored to win the general election in November. As of Tuesday night, Adams, Garcia and Wiley were the top contenders in the initial vote preferences among voters.

These results could change once absentee ballots are included and the ranked-choice tabulation is run.

Updated on: 11:15 p.m. ET, June 22, 2021: NYC Democratic mayoral primary to be decided using ranked-choice voting tabulation, CNN projects

AP/Getty Images

The New York City Democratic mayoral primary winner will be determined using ranked-choice voting tabulation, CNN projects.
Voters in the Big Apple had the option to rank up to five of the 13 candidates in the race. Since no candidate will win a majority of the vote outright, the New York City Board of Elections will tabulate voters’ ranked choices to determine the winner.
The nominee is expected to be determined by mid-July and is heavily favored to win the general election in November.

As of Tuesday night, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, former Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, and civil rights attorney Maya Wiley were the top contenders in the initial vote preferences among voters.

These results could change once absentee ballots are included and the ranked-choice tabulation is run.

What comes next? Since no-candidate will win a majority of the first-choice votes, tabulation will continue in rounds. The candidate with the fewest votes after the initial count will be eliminated and all ballots for that candidate will be reallocated to the next highest-ranked candidate selected. That process will continue with the remaining candidates until two are left with the winner determined by who has the most votes in that final round.
New York City’s Board of Elections plans to release the first set of results from this ranked-choice voting process on June 29, but those results will only include votes from early in-person and election day voters, not absentee ballots. New York state law prevents the board from beginning to count absentee ballots until June 28.

The board will release the results of the ranked-choice voting process again on July 6, this time including as many absentee ballots as they’ve been able to process. They’ll report results again every Tuesday until all the ballots have been counted.

Updated on: 9:52 p.m. ET, June 22, 2021: Here’s what some of the candidates for NYC mayor tweeted as the polls closed

The polls in the New York City primary election are now officially closed. Some candidates in the highly competitive Democratic primary for mayor turned to Twitter to thank supporters and voters.


Here’s what some of the leading candidates are saying:
Eric Adams: Adams wrote on Twitter thanking everyone who “poured their hearts and souls into this race.”

Maya Wiley: Wiley simply tweeted, “I love you, New York.” She also reminded anyone who is in line at 9 p.m. to stay in line and have their vote counted.

Kathryn Garcia:Garcia honored those New Yorkers who died from Covid-19. “We can memorialize their lives in a real, tangible way,” she tweeted. The candidate said that if elected as mayor, “one of the first things I’ll do is make sure we are taking care of our families and kids affected by COVID.”

Updated on: 9:22 p.m. ET, June 22, 2021: NYC polls close in nomination fight for mayor. Here’s why it may take weeks before a winner is called.

The polls for New York City’s primary election closed at 9 p.m ET: The contest for the Democratic mayoral nomination, which will almost certainly determine outgoing Mayor Bill de Blasio’s successor, features 13 candidates, but has in recent weeks appeared to come down to four favorites:


•Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams, a retired captain in the New York Police Department
Former 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang
•Maya Wiley, a civil rights lawyer who served as counsel to de Blasio in his first term
•Former sanitation commissioner Kathryn Garcia

Two Republicans, meanwhile, are vying for their party’s no wemination: Fernando Mateo, a businessman, and Curtis Sliwa, a political activist and radio show host.

Up and down the ballot, in races for mayor, comptroller, five borough presidencies, dozens of open city council seats and district attorney jobs in Manhattan and Brooklyn, New Yorkers are poised to send a signal that resonates beyond the city limits — to Democrats across the country looking to its broad and diverse electorate for a glimpse into the future of the party.

Why a winner won’t be called tonight: The implementation of ranked-choice voting means that the one certainty on primary day is that New Yorkers will have to wait — for weeks — before most of the biggest races are decided.
At some point tonight now that the polls have closed, the city’s Board of Elections will release the first-choice numbers from early and in-person voting. But that will only provide a narrow view of the results.